Short

Case Solution for Selling Short: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Selling Short: Green Mountain Coffee Roasters
Authors :           Martin Dirks
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            W12073
Discipline :        Finance
Case Length :    18 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters is considered as a short sale candidate. (A stock sold short makes money if the stock price declines.) This business is growing at a high rate, but there are signs of potential problems. This is a very real illustration of bullish investors versus bearish investors. Like a mystery novel, there are spies, possible misrepresentation and conflicting information. Decision-making under uncertainty is explored, a factor professional investors must deal with every day. Case discussion topics include risks in short selling, margin loan calculation, investor behavior, stock valuation analysis, forecasting business growth potential, forecasting earnings reports, management incentives, actions taken by management to increase stock price, aggressive accounting practices, assessing business impact of a patent expiration and the impact of business growth rate on stock market valuation.
 
Click Here to place your order
 
OR
Place your order at casesolutionshub (AT)gmail(dot)com if you want to solve above case.
 
Cordially,
Case Solutions Hub
Advertisements

Case Solution for Goldman Sachs and the Big Short: Time to Go Long?

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Goldman Sachs and the Big Short: Time to Go Long?
Authors :           Randall D. Harris
Source :             North American Case Research Association (NACRA)
Case ID :            NA0284
Discipline :        Finance
Case Length :    30 pages
Solution sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
On August 21, 2007, David Viniar, Chief Financial Officer of Goldman Sachs, received an e-mail from a trader in Goldman’s Mortgage Department. In the e-mail, addressed also to Goldman Co-Presidents Gary Cohn and Jon Winkelreid, Joshua Birnbaum outlined a proposal for the firm to move from a net short position in subprime mortgage securities and derivatives to a net long position. Birnbaum claimed that the net long position would not only be profitable but also reduce Mortgage Department and firm-wide risk. This proposal came at a critical time for the subprime mortgage markets in the U.S. and around the world. Subprime mortgage originators such as New Century had filed for bankruptcy. Two Bear Sterns hedge funds that traded subprime mortgages had collapsed. The turmoil had also spread to global markets. Goldman Sachs, unique among New York investment banks, had anticipated the downturn in the subprime mortgage markets and had positioned itself to profit from the meltdown. Now, at a critical juncture, traders on the front lines of the subprime mortgage markets wanted to reverse Goldman’s net short position and go net long. David Viniar knew that the decision to go long could not be taken lightly and would have major implications for the firm, the firm’s overall levels of risk and possibly the firm’s survival. Goldman’s board of directors and key board members had been monitoring the firm’s subprime exposure and would likely want to be consulted regarding such a consequential decision.

Click Here to place your order
 
OR
Place your order at casesolutionshub (AT)gmail(dot)com if you want to solve above case.
 
Cordially,
Case Solutions Hub