Hungary’s

Case Solution for Richter: Information Technology at Hungary’s Largest Pharma

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Richter: Information Technology at Hungary’s Largest Pharma
Authors :           Deborah Compeau, Jordan Mitchell, Gyorgy Drotos, Emma Incze, Gyorgy Vas
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            907E21
Discipline :        Operations Management
Case Length :    23 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
The director of information technology (IT) at Ritcher, a major Hungarian pharmaceutical company with operations throughout Eastern Europe, is in the midst of planning for the IT department for the coming years. The three main considerations for the coming year are: Is the current IT structure appropriate to meet the growing demands of the overall organization? To what extent should IT affiliates be centrally controlled? How can IT best serve the rest of the company?
 
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Case Solution for Strategic Crossroads at Matav: Hungary’s Telecommunications Powerhouse

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Strategic Crossroads at Matav: Hungary’s Telecommunications Powerhouse
Authors :           Michael Rouse, Jordan Mitchell
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            905M33
Discipline :        Strategy
Case Length :    30 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
In September 2004, four months after Hungary joined the European Union, the strategy group of Matav, Hungary’s largest communications company, is working on its mid-term strategic plan. Since being privatized from the state in 1993, the company has seen several changes in its strategy, structure, and culture. Nearly 15 years later, the company is a fully integrated telecommunications company involved in a broad range of services, including fixed line telephony, mobile communications, Internet services, data transmission, and outsourcing. The company’s latest acquisition of a state-run telecommunications company is considered a success, and management believes that international expansion is necessary to realize dynamic growth as its domestic fixed line business is declining. In addition, Hungary’s mobile market is highly competitive and saturated with 80% of the country having mobile phones. The management team feels that Matav is at a crossroads with three main options: expansion in Hungary, regional expansion, or organic growth in existing product lines. The team has to consider all of the lines of business in forming a strategy and whether Matav’s resources and organization are suitable for a healthy future.
 
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Case Solution for Hungary’s Reform Process

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Hungary’s Reform Process
Authors :           David W. Conklin, Danielle Cadieux
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            906M81
Discipline :        General Management
Case Length :    17 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
By 2006, Hungary had experienced more than 15 years of transition from central planning to free markets. The reform process had involved several distinct phases. The initial “leap to the market,” with its widespread privatizations, included a dramatic deregulation with a “guillotine” procedure. A more refined process of “regulatory impact assessments” (RIAs) followed this period. A newly empowered competition office sought to strengthen the extent of competition within markets dominated by a single firm or a small group of firms. The goal of EU membership was a consistent driver of the reforms as early as 1991, since the EU model was compulsory for EU members. These years had been turbulent, and the transition was not yet complete. In 2006, Hungary faced the challenge of a fiscal deficit that was 9.5 per cent of GDP, and responded by raising corporate tax rates from 16 per cent to 20 per cent as an attempt to close the fiscal gap. However, Hungary was in an intense competition with Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania to attract opportunities. Tax rates were an important element in this competition, but so were the regulatory impediments and distortions that still remained in the economy. How to create a rapidly growing economy was a question at the forefront of public policy debate. A 2006 Financial Times article discussed this dilemma.
 
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