Starbucks

Case Solution for Starbucks Canada: The Mobile Payments Decision

Complete Case details are given below :

Case Name :      Starbucks Canada: The Mobile Payments Decision
Authors :           Deborah Compeau, Cato Pastoll, Tyler Rochwerg, Brandon Vlaar
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :           W15169
Discipline :        Information Technology
Case Length :    12 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
In December 2012, the management of Starbucks Canada, an autonomous subsidiary of the U.S.-based multinational coffeehouse chain, is trying to decide how best to implement mobile payments in its 1,350 locations across Canada. While the company has currently been using a mobile application to accept payments through its proprietary Starbucks Card, rival Tim Hortons has recently introduced a more advanced mobile payment solution. There are many new and emerging technologies to choose from, including Square Wallet, Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons, MintChip and Mobile Wallet/Credit Card Near Field Communication. Will these systems allow for an enhanced store experience? Are customers ready to start paying with their smartphones? And which payment service will be the Canadian lead going forward? The future of Starbucks and mobile payments is exciting, but the choices are almost overwhelming.
 
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Case Solution for A Crack in the Mug: Can Starbucks Mend It?

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      A Crack in the Mug: Can Starbucks Mend It?
Authors :           Michael Herriman, Motohiro Wanikawa, Ryoko Ichinose, Shobana Darak, Yumana Chaivan
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            908A16
Discipline :        Operations Management
Case Length :    15 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
After 20 years of rapid expansion, the last six months of 2007 saw Starbucks jolted by a decline in share price of 50 per cent and a decrease in customer visits. Its share price was hovering around $19 to $20. By mid-2008, it had declined to $18. Its fiscal first-quarter profit in 2007 rose by less than two per cent, and in January 2008, it announced the closing of 100 U.S. stores. In July, the number was increased to 600. The case was written to encourage classroom discussion and research into the company policy and marketing practices in order to discover the means for a possible turnaround of the company.
 
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Case Solution for Resuming Internationalization at Starbucks

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Resuming Internationalization at Starbucks
Authors :           Rob Alkema, Mario Koster, Christopher Williams
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            910M73
Discipline :        General Management
Case Length :    16 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
Starbucks enjoyed tremendous growth over the previous two decades. In 2007, it had a global reach of over 17,000 stores in 56 countries. Between 2007 and 2009, however, Starbucks’ relentless march was slowed by three forces: increasingly intense competition, rising coffee bean prices and a global economic recession. In order to remain profitable, the company started to scale back its overseas operations. In 2010, Starbucks was faced with a critical strategic decision: Should the company resume its international expansion and once again intensify its commitments in overseas markets? If so, what approach should the company take? Had the pace of Starbucks’ internationalization (i.e. the rate of opening new stores abroad), the rhythm of its internationalization (i.e. the regularity by which stores were opened abroad) and geographical scope of its internationalization (i.e. number of new countries entered) had an impact on the company’s performance in previous years? Could Starbucks learn from its prior internationalization within the coffee industry in order to guide its future international strategy?
 
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Case Solution for Beanz Versus Starbucks: Personality in a Cup!

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Beanz Versus Starbucks: Personality in a Cup!
Authors :           Edward Gamble, Peter Moroz, Stewart Thornhill, Haley Beer
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            W12020
Discipline :        General Management
Case Length :    14 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
Beanz Espresso Bar is located in downtown Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. It is operating in a market with high rivalry (11 other coffee businesses in a two-block radius). The economy in Prince Edward Island has seen several diners, restaurants, and coffee shops close their doors within the past few years, while simultaneously drawing in large corporate businesses such as Starbucks and Running Room. Beanz has thus far survived the major environmental changes and managed to keep its clientele and the owners, Lori and Doug, feel it is time to either sell Beanz and leave the industry, or exploit their competitive advantages to grow and capture more market share. Beanz specializes in high-quality, baked-from-scratch food and specialty coffee beverages. The café is known for its artistic vibe, warm atmosphere, and eccentric staff. After operating Beanz for 16 years, the couple has made few changes to the decor, menu, the set-up. Internally, the company faces several issues concerning management control systems, marketing, and strategic direction. Lori and Doug must choose between five different directions for the future of Beanz.
 
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Case Solution for Starbucks

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Starbucks
Authors :           Mary M. Crossan, Ariff Kachra
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            98M006
Discipline :        Marketing
Case Length :    28 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
Starbucks is faced with the issue of how it should leverage its core competencies against various opportunities for growth, including introducing its coffee in McDonalds, pursuing further expansion of its retail operations, and leveraging the brand into other product areas. The case is written so that students need to first identify where Starbucks’ competencies lie along the value chain, and then assess how well those competencies can be leveraged across the various alternatives. Also provides an opportunity for students to assess what is driving growth in this company. Starbucks has a tremendous appetite for cash since all its stores are corporate, and investors are betting that it will be able to continue its phenomenal growth so it needs to walk a fine line between leveraging its brand to achieve growth and not eroding it in the process.
 
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Case Solution for Trouble Brews at Starbucks

Complete Case details are given below :
Case Name :      Trouble Brews at Starbucks
Authors :           Lauranne Buchanan, Carolyn J. Simmons
Source :             Ivey Publishing
Case ID :            909A02
Discipline :        Marketing
Case Length :    14 pages
Solution Sample availability : YES
Plagiarism : NO (100% Original work)
Description for case is given below :
After going public in 1992, Starbucks’ strong balance sheet and double-digit growth made it a hot growth stock. The Starbucks vision was coffee culture as community, the Third Place between work and home, where friends shared the experience and exotic language of gourmet coffee. Its growth was fueled by rapid expansion in the number of stores both in the United States and in foreign markets, the addition of drive-through service, its own music label that promoted and sold CDs in stores and other add-on sales, including pastries and sandwiches. In an amazingly short time, Starbucks became a wildly successful global brand. But in 2007, Starbucks’ performance slipped; the company reported its first-ever decline in customer visits to U.S. stores, which led to a 50 per cent drop in its share price. In January 2008, the board ousted CEO Jim Donald and brought back Howard Schultz – Starbucks’ visionary leader and CEO from 1987 to 2000 and current chairman and chief global strategist – to re-take the helm. Starbucks’ growth strategies have been widely reported and analyzed, but rarely with an eye to their impact on the brand. This case offers a compelling example of how “non-brand” managerial decisions – such as store locations, licensing arrangements and drive-through service – can make sense on financial criteria at one point in time, yet erode brand positioning and equity in the longer term. Examining the growth decisions made in the United States provides a rich context in which to examine both the promise and drawback of further foreign expansion.
 
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